West of the Guadalupes

IN TWO PARTS:

1.    the Gypsum Sand Dunes of Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas

and

2.   the Cornudas Mountains of Texas and New Mexico

Where are we going this trip?  Two destinations.  Between the two lies Dell City, Texas, easily recognized from the air by its many crop-circles!

Coming from Carlsbad, New Mexico we drive down (south) on US Highway 62/180 and turn right at the signage for the Dell City Agricultural loop.  At Williams Road there is a sign and we turn right.  The road is good, dirt, but warnings say it is impassible when wet.  It is a clay surface, gets slick.  But not on the day we come here, that white horizontal line is our destination, the gray area just ahead is a dry lake bottom:

The next day we come up from El Paso on the same US Highway 62/180, and turn left on the main street of Dell City (which is about 13 miles from the welcome sign).  Note the center picture, its caption says "The Valley of Hidden Water."  One would never even think that over this dry rise there is agriculture and water, but there is!

Our second destination is to the left of the welcome sign: the Cornudas Mountains.  

This is Dell City in the distance:  amazing!

If we look right from here we see a faint glimpse of the Gypsum Sands area at the foot of the Guadalupe Mountains, where we were yesterday (the faint while line running to the left of the light-colored dry lakes area:

And if we look to the left (west) we see the Cornudas in Texas on the left, and in New Mexico on the right:

So do you have to make a choice?  Yes you do, you have to choose which destination you visit first.  The links are below:

Go to the Gypsum Sand Dunes of Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas

1.  Orientation and Start

2.  Walking the Dunes

3.  Peak Experience

4.  Denouement

Go to the Cornudas Mountains of Texas and New Mexico

1. Some Geology and Sociology Lessons

2. Cornudas Mountains Highlights

3. Leaving the Cornudas Mountains

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